Stop Sign Proposal Revealed

This past summer there was a lot of discussion about Oregon Hill’s traffic flow. The Idlewood roundabout is still coming, and more construction near Monroe Park added fuel to the fire, but the real sparks have been several highly visible accidents at key intersections in the neighborhood. A few neighbors have had their corner properties hit multiple times by vehicles over the years. Thankfully, somehow, there has not been any related fatalities.

The Oregon Hill Neighborhood Association originally, as of a few years ago, voted and asked for a few additional stop signs at these key intersections, namely Spring and Laurel, and Spring and Pine, in order to create what are essentially all way stops. City traffic engineers have rejected them (though other neighborhoods have been able to prevail in their requests). At one point engineers came back with a small roundabout proposal, but neighbors voted that down, in part because of concerns about parking impacts.

Over the last 6 to 8 months, the conversation changed, along with the construction scene, and more elaborate proposals have been brought forward for overall traffic flow and with what is called ‘basketweaving‘.

Jokes aside, the Oregon Hill Neighborhood Association did seriously consider options and ultimately came up its own ‘custom’ proposal.

While nothing has been decided or implemented yet, here it is:

The red circles are where existing stop signs would be changed so that they are ‘flipped’, directing traffic to stop in the opposite directions from the current situations. For example, currently, if you are going north on Pine Street on the 500 block, you do not have to stop, but people approaching on Spring Street do have to stop. In the new scenario, if you were going north on Pine Street on the 500 block, you would stop at the intersection with Spring, and people going west or east on Spring would not have to stop.

Trash/Recycling Pickup Tomorrow

This Wednesday is a “Red Wednesday”, which means trash and recycling pickup. Ideally, rolling recycling containers are stored and deployed in the back alleys along with trash cans. Please make sure you pick up containers after pickup tomorrow night.

If you have not done so already, don’t forget to sign up for your Recycling Perks.
In order to take your recycling to the next level, read this: 10 ways to improve your recycling.

In recycling news, Recycling Steadily Growing More Common in DC-Area Counties.

In Virginia, Fairfax County’s Solid Waste Management program reported a 50 percent recycling rate for 2016.

Recycling numbers for all of Virginia in 2016 should be compiled soon, according to a spokesman for the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality. But data from 2015 show the Richmond area achieved the highest recycling rates at 62.7 percent.

The recycling rate for all of northern Virginia is 47.4 percent.

More Than Presidents

From Hollywood Cemetery‘s FaceBook page:

Presidents Circle is known for the two United States Presidents that rest here, but there are also several other notables in this section.
Matthew Fontaine Maury (known throughout the world as the Pathfinder of the Seas), Joseph Reid Anderson (one of Richmond’s most influential citizens and founder of Tredegar Iron Works – the largest in the South), William Henry Haxall (one of the four visionary founders of Hollywood in 1847), Moses Drury Hogue (first pastor of Second Presbyterian Church in Richmond), and Lawrence Waring (an influential Richmond physician) are also buried here.

New Construction For Civil War Museum

The Times Dispatch has an article on new construction beginning at the American Civil War Museum at Tredegar:

The museum marks a major milestone on that path Monday, when it will break ground on a 29,000-square-foot main exhibit hall and collections storage and preservation center to be built into the hillside at the Tredegar site, incorporating the brick ruins of the old ironworks that powered the Confederate war effort.

The new museum building, at roughly $25 million, will feature a 75-seat immersive “experience theater” that greets visitors on the first floor that aims to tell the story, from all sides, of the war that almost pulled the United States apart. Key themes will revolve around individual decisions and how they were shaped by events.

Congratulations To Open High! Another Excellence Award

Open High School has been awarded a 2017 Board of Education Excellence Award.

This is the second tier in the Virginia Index Of Performance Awards. The VIP incentive program recognizes schools and divisions that exceed state and federal accountability standards and achieve excellence goals established by the governor and the board. This means Open High also met all state and federal accountability benchmarks and made significant progress toward goals for increased student achievement and expanded educational opportunities set by the board.

Oregon Hill is lucky to have such a great neighbor, which can trace its history (and protection) back to Grace Arents’ legacy.

Hopefully, this will add pressure to put ALL schools first. It would also be great to see Open High’s aging building get more fully renovated in a historically sensitive manner.

Solar Eclipse Viewing Party on Brown’s Island Announced

From press release:

Richmond Riverfront Partners to Host Solar Eclipse Viewing Party on Brown’s Island

RICHMOND, Va.— It’s almost here! On Monday, August 21, Richmonders will have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to view the solar eclipse making its way across North America. The National Park Service in Richmond, American Civil War Museum, James River Park System, and Venture Richmond invite the public to experience this event on Brown’s Island from 1-4 pm. Staff from these riverfront partners will distribute 600 free pairs of NASA-approved Rainbow Symphony solar eclipse viewing eyeglasses beginning at 1 pm, and pop-up tents on site will feature information on the eclipse as well as upcoming programs along the riverfront. Additionally, a limited-edition National Park Service Junior Ranger solar eclipse booklet and badge will be available to 200 children between ages 5 and 14.

“We’re so excited to partner with our friends along the riverfront for this unique event,” said Andrea DeKoter, Chief of Interpretation for Richmond National Battlefield Park and Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site. “I invite the public to join us for a fun – and safe – viewing of the solar eclipse.”

For more information, please contact the Richmond National Battlefield Park at (804) 226-1981, or visit us online at www.nps.gov/rich or www.Facebook.com/RichmondNPS.